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Posts Tagged ‘Moab Utah’

With the fabulous weather camping is predominantly sought in the desert around Moab Utah. The tricky bit is determining the location for the convenient access of specific adventures. Which adventures? Mountain biking, hiking, climbing, 4-wheeling and OHV trail riding are among those.

Which Campgrounds Have Access to Your Activity?

Sand Flats Recreation area is home to the Slickrock Bike Trail and contains the Porcupine Rim Trail. Camping is limited to 9 various locations amounting to 120 individual sites. Besides the mountain biking to be had, motorized use enjoys, Hells Revenge and the Fins and Things trails. Sand Flats is attractive for the owners of OHV’s which are NOT street legal. These OHVs – UTVs/ATVs/Motorcycle trail bikes can be ridden right out of camp to the trails in Sand Flats.

Similarly, Horsethief Campground off of Hwy 313 serves OHV users desiring to ride out of camp. There is a tremendous network of trails in the region north of Moab. It is best to have maps of the area to see how all the segments mesh. Nearby is Cowboy Camp, a little spot for tent camping – no camp trailers allowed. From this Hwy 313 camp, mountain bikers can connect to the Navajo Rocks trail system, the Intrepid Trail system in Dead Horse Point State Park and/or the many routes in the Gemini Bridges area, like the Magnificent Seven and the newest Horsethief bike trail network.

For the climbers, Wall Street on Hwy 279 is a popular hang out to belay buddies. Close to the climbing are Jaycee Park and Williams Bottom camping areas. Those have nice tent camping and have the essential pit toilet for conveniently fulfilling the Leave No Trace adage. Near Big Bend Campground on Hwy 128, the Bureau of Land Management has established a proper parking area for bouldering. Find a map in Karl Kelley’s, High on Moab, the newest and all around informative climber guide including 21 challenging boulders. Drinks Canyon, Hal Canyon and Oak Grove Campgrounds would also be places to stay to be close to Big Bend Boulders.

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Pipe Safe for BLM First Come, First Served Sites $15 a night

Also on Hwy 128, consider Lower Onion Creek for camping access for rolling right out of camp to 4-wheel or OHV Onion Creek and connecting with Top of the World and Polar Mesa. Fisher Towers is best as a tent camping spot and serves up some nice hiking and climbing.

Out on Kane Creek Road, Moonflower Canyon shall have fewer walk-in tent sites. Spring Canyon walk-in tent sites out along Kane Creek Road will be closed and reclaimed.  Find additional walk-in sites added to Kings Bottom to balance out the removal of the others. Got a motorhome? Toy hauler? Head out to the Ledges camping area where there are 105 sites with access to dirt trails from camp.

Prefer a full hook-up? Make reservations with a commercial campground in Moab. Street Legal UTVs are able to drive to trails. Archview Resort is the only campground near Moab to ride an ATV out of camp and get that full hook up for an RV. North 38 miles, in Thompson Springs are hookups at the Ballard RV Park. Trails can be ridden out of there. Find out more in the Third Edition of Charles A. Wells, Guide to Moab, UT Backroads & 4-Wheel-Drive Trails.

Behind the Rocks is 14 miles south of Moab. Turn west off of Hwy 191. There will be no camping signs posted here.  Camping is not allowed from the turn off for about 3 miles. After that distance some sites for tent camping appear. Keep going. The first two dirt roads off to the south go to houses. Keep going. The next roads lead to a tear drop design of RV sites. The most important matter here is to have a portable toilet to use in the Behind the Rocks area. Tent campers can purchase wag-bags (a means of packing out human refuse) from the Moab Information Center. Nice trail riding out here, dappled with arches.

The Moab Information Center is teeming with area maps. Stop in to get maps or guide books to see the many trail options available in and around Moab Utah. It is located at the corner of Main and Center Street, open 7 days a week.

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Arches National Park is reserved online using recreation.gov. It sells out months in advance. No hookups. Dead Horse Point, Utah, State Park also reserves camping online. Dead Horse has electrical hookups. It too sells out months in advance. Canyonlands National Park has first come, first served camping. No OHV use allowed in the national parks of Moab.  So the parks are great for hikers especially.

When the weather is fine, camping is popular. Most important about backcountry use, enthusiasts are required to Leave No Trace, which means using portable toilets or camping in sites with pit toilets. Gathering firewood is prohibited. Bring your own or buy bundles from many shops in Moab. South town Maverick has a free dump station for RVs. Bring a hose to fill up with water from the side of the Maverick store seen from the dump station. Spanish Trail Shell can refill propane tanks and allows filling water from a faucet along the curb near where the propane is dispensed.  Again bring a hose to fill an RV. Farm and City Seed and Feed does it all, dump, water ($5 fee), and propane in one stop.

Find more camping details on http://discovermoab.com/campgrounds.htm or call 435-259-8825.

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111miles

In mountain bike circles, the Slickrock Trail is famous! It requires stamina and skill to negotiate the petrified sand dunes that comprise the trail. Mountain biking has escalated with travel for riding and trail building by destinations across the United States and the world. Moab has stayed relevant to mountain biking due to the effort of the volunteers of the Moab Trail Mix. Now alternative slickrock can be ridden for less extreme pedaling, yet there is ample expert terrain too. There are trails that are sufficient for the entire family in Moab. If you haven’t bicycled Moab lately, you haven’t biked Moab. You can no longer say, ‘Been there, done that’ about Moab.

The uranium miners steered into the far reaches around Moab in the 1950s using two wheel drive and the granny gear. As that boom passed and recreation dawned, fat tire biking used those dirt roads along with four wheel drive users. As recreation booms, an abundance of travelers cued a variety of segments for single track mountain bike pedaling, ATV only trails, single track trail motorcycling, as well as, 4×4 vehicle use on Moab’s surrounding trails.

Check out DiscoverMoab.com for the quintessential overview of Mountain Bike trails of Moab. Green Circles, Blue Squares and Black Diamonds have been assigned to trails to better enable visitors to select a trail according to ability. A network of trails are found in some areas so a carload can travel together yet ride separate trails in relation to recovering from yesterday’s epic ride, or start with an easy one to progress to another level of skill or ply those skills for more difficult trail lines. Obviously, if you haven’t pedaled Moab lately, you really haven’t pedaled Moab. Come check out 111 miles of mountain bike trails in Moab. Print the maps on http://discovermoab.com/biking.htm and bring them along. Or purchase each map at a local Moab bike shops for $2-$3 each. That money goes into the treasury of the Moab Trail Mix, the fine organization building and maintaining Moab’s excellent variety of mountain bike trails. Need more travel information? Phone 435-259-8825 Monday – Friday 8 AM – 5 PM Mountain Standard Time or email info2@discovermoab.com.

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Arches National Park News Moab Utah USA

Visitation grows in Arches National Park. Here are some useful tips to circumvent peak uses of The Windows Section, Devil’s Garden, and the trail head parking lot for hiking to the iconic Delicate Arch.

Planning Your Trip
•Park is open 24/7. Use Sunrise/Sunset table to plan visits outside of 10 am to 4 pm peak hours.
•Early morning (sunrise) is always less busy than sunset. To beat the crowds, try entering the park before 8 a.m., though you may encounter groups of early-morning photographers at some destinations.
•Avoid visiting on BUSY Holidays/Weekends.
•Parking for oversize vehicles (RVs, trailers) is extremely limited. Leave oversized vehicles in town, or in the visitor center parking lot. Rent a car.
•Carpool if you can.
•Consider joining a tour for an Arches Park visit.
Fiery Furnace and Arches Group Vehicle Trips

Where (and how) to Park
•Park in designated areas only.
•Abstain from parking on vegetation
•Park to keep traffic flow clear
•Refrain from blocking traffic waiting to park

BUSY Holidays/Weekends

1.Easter week
(March 27-April 5 2015)
2.Memorial Day
(May 23-25 2015)
3.Labor Day
(September 4-7 2015)
4.Utah Education Assoc.
(October 15-18 2015)

Arches Park Tours

Adrift Adventures
Moab Adventure Center 
Navtec Expeditions
Red River Adventures
Tag-A-Long Expeditions
Windgate Adventures 

Fiery Furnace tours and Sightseeing Drives

National Park Fee Free
Arches and Canyonlands are free to enter on the following dates.
February 14-16
Presidents Day weekend
April 18-19
National Park Week intro
August 25
NPS Birthday
September 26
National Public Lands Day
November 11
Veterans Day

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Utah Open Lands has had the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour held in Moab in March for years now.

In 2012, the La Sal Mountain Avalanche Center brings Radical Reels from Banff to Moab for a fundraiser in October.

In 2013, there is the debut of the Moab International Film Festival along with the Western Film Festival and the “reel west”. Both will be held in September.

The October Moab Ho-Down has added a Mountain Bike Film Festival component to the festivities these last few years. Here is the winning 2011 film.

And the Grand County Public Library in partnership with the Utah Film Center has been bringing film screenings to Moab throughout the year as well. This year’s titles were: ” How to Die in Oregon”, “The City Dark”, “Urban Roots”, “Watershed”, “Tree of Life”, “Blindsight”, and “A Separation”.

Moab International Film Festival

Just one of Four film festivals occurring in Moab in 2013.

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Geocaching is a fun way to explore any destination. It is a treasure hunt undertaken with a GPS navigator. You are looking for a container. Every container has a log book. Many have items. You may take one, if you leave one of equal or greater value.  Some times there are trackable items. This requires the finder to log in to view the history and if you take it, you must travel it to another cache and record that too. Utah State Parks has a page dedicated to the geocaches in participating parks. Dead Horse Point State Park has a geocache. Moab will not disappoint visitors with around 550 geocache locations. Bring your GPS and some treasure to trade!

www.geocaching.com

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Bryce and Kaylie Packard celebrate “One Year Wedding Anniversary“. Guess where? yep, Moab.

Read their blog post to find out why a red sox hat is appended to this fabulous reason to travel to Moab. (ANNIVERSARIES!)

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Image by Sheila Liewald

 

An avalanche across Interstate 70 on Vail Pass adds two hours to the arrival to Moab. The hold up is paled with incredible views in the morning from the tent pupped in Moab. The days are filled with hiking, biking, climbing and monkeying around. Read Sheila’s own words as she blogs about her trip with her friend Sherry.

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