Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Moab’s Grand County consists of 3,682 square miles. Take a ride around the county to locate alternative Arches to be seen while in Moab. Whether your preference is hiking, biking, 4wheeling or sightseeing from the pavement, an arch is set aloft of the natural crevices and broadways, awaiting your gaze. The main arteries, State Roads 128, 279, 313, 211, and 191, are obvious routes once you have arrived in Moab. Moab is such a little quaint town. Get a map and head out. So what is your preference?

Sightseeing by Vehicle on Pavement

Updraft Arch

Description:  Updraft Arch is up top of the rim of the canyon wall. It is eroded into Navajo sandstone on the south side of S.R. 128.

How to get there:  From the intersection of Hwy 191 and S.R. 128 around .9 miles Updraft Arch is poised high up on the rim.  There is a driveway 1.1 miles out. You have past the arch when you reach this landmark. It may be best to stop at this parking lot head down a foot path to the paved Goose Island Trail to walk back upstream to search for Updraft Arch again. It will be around .2 miles from the parking lot.    Latitude: 38°36’2.95″  Longitude: -109°33’33.41″

Huntress Arch

Description:  Huntress Arch blends in on the smooth slickrock face toward the rear of a little side canyon. Look for two orbs near, but below the rim in the wall toward the back left side of the canyon.

How to get there:  Park temporarily at Goose Island Campground. It is 1.4 miles along S.R. 128 from the junction with Highway 191.  Across the road is a shallow side canyon. Huntress Arch is in there.                        Latitude: 38°36’22.93″  Longitude: -109°32’17.41″

Little Arch and Jug Handle Arch

Description:  A sign indicates the position of Jug Handle Arch. It is beyond Corona Arch hiking trail and Gold Bar Campground at the intersection of Long Canyon. Long Canyon is a popular 4×4 route which is often impassable during or after severe rains. Little Arch is high on the canyon wall. No signs. It is more difficult to locate. There are pull offs in the area to stop and ply searching. Watch for traffic.

How to get there:  Drive 13.5 miles on State Road 279 from the intersection of Highway 191 and S.R. 279.  There will be a sign designating Jug Handle Arch. This road is also known as the Potash Road. Watch for Little Arch in the north rim on your way in to and out from Jug Handle. It is at approximately 3.5 miles from the junction of Hwy 191 and S.R. 279. And approximately 10.1 miles from Jug Handle back toward Hwy 191.

Day Trip South Of Moab

Looking Glass Arch

Description: It is located in a somewhat solitary feature of sandstone referred to as Looking Glass Rock.

How to get there:  Drive south of Moab on Hwy 191, catch Looking Glass Arch on Looking Glass Road, a passable 2 mile dirt road 23 miles south of Moab. Stay on pavement when the road is wet.

Wilson Arch

Description:  Wilson Arch measures 46 feet high and 91 feet wide. There are two very large parking lots on either side of Hwy 191. To stop to take photographs.

How to get there:  Sticking to the pavement, 26 miles south on Hwy 191 is the huge Wilson Arch, a road side phenomenon.

Lopez Arch

Description:  Fernin R. Lopez ran cattle in La Sal. He was a well-known and trusted ranch foreman.

How to get there:  Lopez Arch is small, yet visible to the east side of Hwy 191 at mile marker 98.

Wooden Shoe Arch

Description:  It is always fun to find arches in the shape of familiar things. This one reminds the viewer of a Dutch clog.

How to get there:  Turn off of Hwy 191 onto Hwy 211.  Near the end of Hwy 211 is the entrance to the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This is a fee area. Wooden Shoe Arch will be on the southern horizon along the way and you will instantly know why it got that name. A road sign points out Wooden Shoe Arch too. Take a moment to stop at the Wooden Shoe Overlook.

Always carry food and ample water for sightseeing in the desert canyon country.

Hiking to an arch

Three hikes are found off of S.R. 279.

Longbow Arch

Description: Longbow Arch is an established hike from the Poison Spider Trail parking lot. Besides the trail to the natural arch, the trail forks to petroglyphs and dinosaur tracks. The Longbow Arch trail has an initial climb of a few hundred feet of elevation. Then the trail evens out. This is a great path-finding opportunity for youngsters. The trail is marked with green paint along sandstone or green flagging across sandy patches and washes. The end of the trail is not marked. It is in a narrow slip that climbs gradually beneath and past the arch to switch back to gain ground beneath Longbow Arch. It is 1.2 miles out-and-back.

How to get there: Longbow Arch is an established hike from the Poison Spider Trail parking also along S.R. 279.   Corona Arch. Poison Spider Mesa parking lot on SR 279. Trail accessed between the pit toilet and nearby informational kiosk.

Corona Arch

Description: On the trail to Corona Arch watch for other arches along the way, like Bowtie and Pinto

Arches.  The trail climbs up to a railroad track and visitor registration box. Go over the tracks down the other side to follow rock cairns along the base of a cliff, across slickrock and sand patches. The trail has a cable strung along slickrock. Walk on the uphill side of the cable here. A second cable provides a hand hold for ascending sandstone with notches carved for foot holds. At the top of this passage is a fiver rung ladder to gain another little pitch. Corona Arch can be seen from this landing, more or less. Another 250 yards of walking you can be underneath the arch.

How to get there: Drive 10 miles along S.R. 279 from the Hwy 191 junction to find the Corona Arch parking lot. Across the road is the Gold Bar Campground.

Goldbar Arch (a.k.a. Jeep Arch)

38.59907°N / 109.63955°W

Description: Canyon bottom walking comes to a dry pour over. Find the beaten path to the right/east of this obstacle to get beyond it. After some distance another pour-over will be passed again to the right. Travel on slickrock with huge boulders. Watch for cairns on the left to leave this floor to go up a slope. The trail eventually forks. It is a loop with a scramble through the arch back around. The trail gains 900 feet from the culvert. It is 3.5 miles round trip.

How to get there: Goldbar Arch can be found beyond Corona Arch parking lot .3 miles more on S.R. 279. Go through the culvert under the railroad track.

Two hikes are accessed off of S.R. 313

Streak Arch

 

Description: Walk up the South Fork of Seven Mile Canyon to Streak Arch. Cross the road, Hwy 313, to hike about 1 3/4 miles up the canyon, arch is on the left. The Desert Varnish, manganese stains are beautiful and give this arch this name.

 

How to get there: Park at a small turnout on the right about 2.3 miles from Hwy 191 onto Hwy 313.

 

Jewel Tibbetts Arch

Description: This 1.6 mile loop starts on a dirt road but soon leaves the road to go through several dry washes to rejoin a road no longer available to motorized use. After the trail leaves this old road, follow rock cairns across ledges, through Pinyon-Juniper woodland to the slickrock edge of 400’ deep Hell Roaring Canyon. Use caution on the cliff section near the canyon rim.

 

How to get there: Go to mile 13.6 off of SR 313. Drive the dirt road 1.5 miles west to the trailhead parking lot.

 

One hike is off of Kane Springs Road.

Hunter Canyon Arch

Description: . The arch is about a half mile from the Hunter Canyon parking lot and up on the right side of Hunter Canyon. In the spring water may be flowing in Hunter Canyon.

How to get there: Hunter Canyon is off of Kane Creek Road, where pavement turns into a two wheel drive dirt road. Kane Creek Road has a switch back and creek crossing that should be considered for clearance. The arch is about a half mile from the Hunter Canyon parking lot and up on the right side of Hunter Canyon. In the spring water may be flowing in Hunter Canyon.

Mountain bikes are NOT allowed on this list of hiking trails.

Biking to an Arch

Road cycling on Scenic Byway 313 is popular.   Mesa Arch 

Description: Bike from the town of Moab along the paved Moab Canyon Pathway (72.4 miles round trip), park at the junction of Hwy 191 and S.R. 313 (47.8 miles round trip), or unload the road bicycle at one of the viewpoints out along S.R. 313 to pedal into Canyonlands. The viewpoint at the top of the switchback would be a 41.2 miles ride. Don’t forget the $10 for a biker’s entrance fee or to bring your Federal Recreation Land Pass.

How to get there: The wide shoulders on S.R. 313 are appreciated. Pedaling into the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park the road narrows significantly. If traffic is low, head to the Mesa Arch trailhead 6 miles from the park boundary. Lock up the bike to stretch out walking this .5 mile loop to enjoy an arch situated on the edge of a precipice. No biking on the trail. Returning to Moab, watch the distant skyline. You are peering into Arches National Park. The windows section makes a spectacle of their self.

Mountain Biking  also in Canyonlands.

Musselman Arch

Description: Musselman Arch is on the White Rim in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park .Bicycling, 4Wheeling or dual sport motorcycling each require a free day use permit. The ISKY visitor center issues those permits. Or complete the online reservation 48 hours at most before the date of use. Use will be capped at 50 for day-use bicycling.

How to get there: Ideally, hire a shuttle to the Island in the Sky, ride down the Shafer Trail out to Musselman Arch. Or hire jetboat  services to drop you off at Lathrop Canyon to pedal from river to White Rim passing Musselman on the way out. Make it an epic 49 mile ride back to town via the Potash Road (Hwy 279). Or follow the jetboat to the Potash Boat Ramp and park there to end this ride at the ramp.

Pritchett Arch

 

Description: Natural Arch on the edge of the Behind the Rocks Wilderness Study Area. Length is .5 miles out-and-back. The trail is a wash, then crosses slickrock benches, ledges, and requires scrambling. If you are lucky you will see vehicles stuck at Rocker Knocker, The Rock Pile and Yellow Hill, three nasty ledges with no vehicle by-pass. Pritchett Bridge can be a fantastic mountain bike ride. The 4×4 road is treacherous even for skilled 4wd drivers, is much more navigable by bike. Worth $2 to cross private land from Kane Creek Rd and pedal 4.2 miles to view Pritchett and Halls Bridges. Or run a shuttle to bike a 22 mile course through the Behind the Rocks trail system. From this direction you should find a directional ‘Pritchett’ post at every intersection.

 

How to get there:  Pritchett Canyon is 4.5 miles from Highway 191 out Kane Creek Road. You must pay a private land owner to access the canyon from this point. This is one of the most difficult 4×4 roads in the area. Consider mountain biking or hiking 5.1 miles up Pritchett Canyon Jeep Road from Kane Creek to hike a short .5 spur to the arch.

 

Doing some 4 Wheeling?

A backcountry map will either name or indicate a Natural Arch to be found along a myriad of trails. Ample rentals are available to travel the dirt roads. Make reservations for rental jeeps, OHVs or trail motorcyles. There are tour companies who will drive ahead and lead visitors to these spots too.

Uranium Arch

 

Description:

Uranium Arch has a 75 ft span. Near the arch is a sign painted on slickrock indicating “arch”. The final part of the trail to the base of the arch is difficult terrain, park and walk or negotiate it with a properly equipped 4WD vehicle.

 

How to get there: From the junction of Hwy 191 and S.R. 313 set your mileage, continue north on Hwy 191 5/8 of a mile. Find a wide dirt parking lot. This is the trailhead for Sevenmile Rim Trail or jeep trail no.9 on the Trails Illustrated/National geographic Map Moab North Map 500.   On the dirt road keep left at 1 1/8 miles fork. In an 8th of a mile turn right at a second fork.  Now traveling north for 5/8 mile for another left turn (still on Jeep Trail No. 9 – follow Sevenmile rim Trail signs) for ¼ mile where road goes south. Keep left for the next 3 forks. The dirt trail goes aound the south end of Corral canyon, flows a cliff for 1/2mile then turns right for another 3/8 of a mile to Uranium arch.

 

 

 

Arrowhead Arch

 

Description: Collapsed sometime in first part of 2010 and spanned 17 feet. Find Squaw Window 1 km northeast of Arrowhead on the same cliff-line.

 

How to get there: At Dewy Bridge on S.R. 128 turn onto the Owl Draw Upland road. Continue past Buck Spring. Keep right as the road jogs 90 degrees from a southwest direction to a westerly direction. Watch for a lighter duty dirt road, a right hand turn leading to a prominent sandstone outcropping. The arch is atop the sandstone feature.

 

Picture Frame

Description: On the way to Picture Frame arch you get to see Balcony Arch too.

 

How to get there:

Drive south from Moab on Hwy 191. About 12.3 miles, turn right or west onto the Behind the Rock Road. It is 5.4 miles of two wheel drive to Lone Rock (also known as Prostitute Butte). At this junction, a sign will indicate the way to Pritchett Arch. Turn right. The trail is now 4WD and goes along the side of Lone Rock. Watch for Balcony Arch at the very top of the butte. You cannot climb to Balcony Arch. Picture Frame Arch  becomes visible at the turn around at the backside of Lone Rock. You can walk up to Picture Frame Arch

 

Visit the Moab Information Center for maps. Located at the Corner of Main and Center Streets in downtown Moab. Use www.discovermoab.com  to find bike or 4×4 rentals and tours. More information is a phone call away as well, 435-259-8825.

 

This brochure is presented as a courtesy to area visitors. No warranty, expressed or implied, is made as to the safety or ongoing validity of information listed herein. The Moab Area Travel Council or it’s agents are not responsible for any liability arising from the use of the information herein.

 

In cooperation with:  The Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service and San Juan County Tourism.

 

Canyon Country  Minimum Impact Practices

  1. Tread lightly and leave no trace. Drive , pedal and hike on established roads and trails. Hiking is appropriate on rock and in washes besides designated trails. Camp in marked sites. Use a stove rather than a campfire. Backcountry camping requires a portable toilet in southeastern Utah. Tent camping is better suited to campsites with pit toilets. RVs may utilize Bureau of Land Management or State Trust Land dispersed sites. Use only previously occupied locations. No bushwhacking new sites. Gathering firewood is prohibited.
  2. Keep canyon country clean. Pack out trash. Remove solid human waste. Clean up after less thoughtful visitors. Recycling center is located on the Sandflats Road.
  3. Protect scarce desert water sources. Keep 300 feet from isolated water sources to allow wildlife access. Leave potholes undisturbed. Wash away from these precious pools or springs. Carry all of your own drinking water.
  4. Allow space for wildlife. Maintain distance and remain quiet when encountering wildlife. Keep children and pets under control and away from wildlife.
  5. Leave historic sites untouched for preservation. Admire Native American rock art, ruins and artifacts from a distance. Walk clear of dinosaur tracks. Scratching, painting, chalking, rubbings, and casts are forbidden, and damage sites. Make pictures. Teach others to respect these ‘open-air museums’. Report violations.
  6. Learn to recognize to preserve biological soil crust. This delicate, often black, crusty-looking , complex of soil and slow growing algae, moss, bacteria, and lichen retains water, reduces erosion, and provides a stable base from which higher plants can flourish.

Published by  Moab Area Travel Council in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management Moab District Office, Trail Mix, SITLA and San Juan County.

 

 

While in Moab, don’t skip over a chance to walk alongside the footprints of me and some of my oldest friends (and not-so-friends)!  A real paleontologist will be there to guide you along some of Utah’s best fossil sites.  You can even follow the paleontologist back into town for more dino fun and facts, and the chance to hold real fossils!

Programs are presented at several locations throughout the Moab area. These locations are identified below, or maps are freely available at the Moab Information Center or the Bureau of Land Management.

These programs run from July 29th through September 4th.

July

Jul 29    Jurassic Walk and Talk  Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Mill Canyon Tracksite at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, bring the kids by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Fun with Fossils”—a free hands-on learning activity led by a paleontologist.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Jul 30    Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Mill Canyon Bone Trail at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones”—a free paleontology talk about the Moab area’s dinosaurs.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Jul 31    Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Poison Spider Dinosaur Tracksite at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Dino Tracks and Facts”—a free paleontology talk about dinosaur tracks found in the Moab area.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

August

Aug 5     Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Dinosaur Stomping Ground at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, bring the kids by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Fun with Fossils”—a free hands-on learning activity led by a paleontologist.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 6     Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Copper Ridge Dinosaur Trackway at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones”—a free paleontology talk about the Moab area’s dinosaurs.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 7     Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Mill Canyon Tracksite at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Dino Tracks and Facts”—a free paleontology talk about dinosaur tracks found in the Moab area.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 12   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Mill Canyon Bone Trail at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, bring the kids by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Fun with Fossils”—a free hands-on learning activity led by a paleontologist.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 13   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Poison Spider Dinosaur Trackway at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones”—a free paleontology talk about the Moab area’s dinosaurs.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 14   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Dinosaur Stomping Ground at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Dino Tracks and Facts”—a free paleontology talk about dinosaur tracks found in the Moab area.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 19   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Copper Ridge Dinosaur Trackway at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, bring the kids by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Fun with Fossils”—a free hands-on learning activity led by a paleontologist.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 20   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Mill Canyon Tracksite at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones”—a free paleontology talk about the Moab area’s dinosaurs.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 21   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Mill Canyon Bone Trail at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Dino Tracks and Facts”—a free paleontology talk about dinosaur tracks found in the Moab area.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 26   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Poison Spider Dinosaur Trackway at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, bring the kids by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Fun with Fossils”—a free hands-on learning activity led by a paleontologist.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 27   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Dinosaur Stomping Ground at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones”—a free paleontology talk about the Moab area’s dinosaurs.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Aug 28   Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Copper Ridge Dinosaur Trackway at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Dino Tracks and Facts”—a free paleontology talk about dinosaur tracks found in the Moab area.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

September

Sep 2      Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at Mill Canyon Tracksite at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, bring the kids by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Fun with Fossils”—a free hands-on learning activity led by a paleontologist.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Sep 3      Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Mill Canyon Bone Trail at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones”—a free paleontology talk about the Moab area’s dinosaurs.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

Sep 4      Jurassic Walk and Talk Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at the Poison Spider Dinosaur Trackway at 9 am.  After daytime adventuring, come by the Moab Information Center at 6 pm for “Dino Tracks and Facts”—a free paleontology talk about dinosaur tracks found in the Moab area.  For directions and additional information, see ad in Moab Happenings or call the BLM at (435) 259-2100.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mill Canyon Track Site Sign

Copper Ridge

  • Length of Hike:  1/2 mile (0.80 km) round trip. Allow 30 minutes for guided hike.
  • Site Attractions: The Copper Ridge site features the first tracks of a long-necked, plant eating sauropod dinosaur ever found in Utah, along with carnivorous dinosaur tracks preserved in the 150 million year old Jurassic-aged Morrison Formation.
  • Trailhead Location: From Moab, go north on US Highway 191 for 23 miles. Turn right 3/4 mile (1.2 km) past milepost 148 (just north of the microwave tower at the “North Klondike” sign). Cross the railroad tracks and follow the signs south on the dirt road. It is 2 miles (3.2 km) to the trackways from the highway.

Dinosaur Stomping Ground

  • Length of Hike:  3 miles (4.8 km) round trip. Allow 2.5 hours for guided hike.
  • Site Attractions: The tracks you see at this site are preserved in the Jurassic-aged Entrada Sandstone. The portion of the Moab Megatracksite that you visit on this hike is known as the “Dinosaur Stomping Grounds;” it contains over 2,300 single tracks in an area of about two acres. Most of these tracks represent large carnivorous dinosaurs.
  • Trailhead Location:  From Moab, go north on US 191 for 23 miles. Turn right 3/4 mile (1.2 km) past milepost 148. Cross the railroad tracks and follow the main road for 1 mile (1.6 km). Take the right fork (left fork goes to the Copper Ridge Dinosaur Tracksite) and continue for just over ½ a mile (0.8 km) to the Megasteps Mountain Biking Trailhead parking area. Trail departs from here.

Mill Canyon Dinosaur Bone Trail

  • Length of Hike:  1/4 mile (0.4 km) round trip. Allow 30 minutes for guided hike.
  • Site Attractions: Dinosaur bone still encased in Jurassic-aged rock may be viewed in Mill Canyon. These rocks contain the fossilized dinosaur bones of Allosaurus, Camarasaurus, Camptosaurus and Diplodocus, and petrified wood.
  • Trailhead Location: Drive 15 miles (24.14 km) north of Moab on U.S. 191, the turn left onto a dirt road (marked “Mill Canyon”). This road is just north of highway milepost 141. Be careful when crossing the train tracks. Proceed 0.6 miles (0.96 km) on this dirt road to a “Y” intersection with a parking lot. Take the left fork and go 1/2 mile (0.8 km) to another intersection. Turn right here. The Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail is 0.6 miles (0.96 km) away along this route. At the trailhead, you will find a parking area and interpretive signs both at the parking area and along the trail itself.

Mill Canyon Dinosaur Tracksite

  • Length of Hike:  1/4 mile (0.4 km) round trip. Allow 30 minutes for guided hike.
  • Site Attractions: The Mill Canyon Dinosaur Tracksite is one of the largest and most diverse dinosaur tracksites known in the United States. A minimum of 6 different dinosaur tracks, along with crocodile tracks, can be viewed. This 112 million year old site contains one of the world’s largest known tracksites from this period of geologic time.
  • Trailhead Location: From Moab, take Highway 191 north for 15 miles (24.14 km) to Mill Canyon Rd.  Turn left onto Mill Canyon Rd. and travel approximately one mile to the “Y” intersection of Mill Canyon Rd. and Cotter Mine Rd.  Turn left onto Cotter Mine Rd. and continue for another ½ mile (0.8 km) to a second large parking area. Once in this parking area, the trail departs from the east side near the kiosk.

Poison Spider Dinosaur Tracksite

  • Length of Hike:  1/2 mile (0.80 km) round trip. Allow 30 minutes for guided hike.
  • Site Attractions: 190 million years ago the area around what is now Moab was covered in huge sand dunes. Between dune fields were scattered flat areas of wet sand, shallow ponds, and small streams. Dinosaurs crossed these flats and left their footprints for you to view now.
  • Trailhead Location: From the center of Moab, travel north on Highway 191 for 5.9 miles (9.5 km) and turn left on Highway 279 (the “Potash Road”). Continue 6 miles (9.7 km) from this junction, which follows along the Colorado River, until you reach the “Dinosaur Track” sign, where the route leaves the pavement to the right. The parking lot is at the top of this hill.

Fun with Fossils

  • Length of Activity:  Allow 30-45 minutes for talk and activity.
  • Join Us For: Join us as we introduce you to some of the area’s most famous prehistoric residents!  A short show-and-tell talk will be led by a BLM paleontologist, followed by a fun and engaging activity appropriate for all ages.
  • Activity Location: Moab Information Center Porch, 25 E Center Street, Moab, UT 84532.

Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones

  • Length of Activity:  Allow 30-45 minutes for talk.
  • Join Us For: Learn about the regional geology, local dinosaur, and other fossil discoveries found in the Moab region.  It’s bound to be a bona fide good time!
  • Activity Location: Moab Information Center Porch, 25 E Center Street, Moab, UT 84532.

Dino Tracks and Facts

  • Length of Activity:  Allow 30-45 minutes for talk.
  • Join Us For: Learn about the regional geology, how tracks are made, and the dinosaur trackways preserved in the Moab area.  It will leave a lasting impression!
  • Activity Location: Moab Information Center Porch, 25 E Center Street, Moab, UT 84532.

For more information, please contact: Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Moab – 435-259-2100

At the end of a day’s adventure, what goes on in town? Pick up the free publication, Moab Happenings. It has a section dedicated to live music and evening entertainment. Although for something different, Kate Cannon, Superintendent of the Southeastern Group of Utah National Parks urges, “Try a park after dark”.

Currently, Canyonlands has been awarded the Gold Tier status and designation as an International Dark Sky Park. However, being on vacation, perhaps a relaxing drink is in order. Moab is abounding with options.

Drink:

Atomic Lounge, 900 N Hwy 191, an upscale choice, bringing back the cocktail, mixed with fresh juices and in house syrups. Drinking establishment serving small plates, located on site of the Moab Burger Company if hunger really hits.

Woody’s Tavern, 221 South Main, declares to have the Coldest Beer in Moab! Inside there are pool and foosball tables, live music plays most weekends. Outside there is the Cabana Bar.

New! The Alley, once a special events space is now a pub at the Gravel Pits Lanes, 1078 E Mill Creek Drive. Gravel Pits Lanes came under new owners. The arcade is freshened up. The Snack Bar is expanded for lighter fare dinners. And every Saturday at 8 PM, there is the Rock N’ Bowl. Pay $15 per person for unlimited bowling, the tunes are cranked up, the black lights turned on, the disco ball spins for cosmic bowling until 11 PM. Cheapest pitchers in town!

The Blu Pig’s Blu Bar is going for it! Live music scheduled every night! Serving a selection of whisky, tequila and beer, look for the IPL, yes, IPL on tap, specially crafted for the Blu Pig, 811 S Main Street.

Moab Brewery, 686 S Main Street, has handcraft ales to enjoy by the pint, pitcher, or a sampler. In the bar, adjacent to the restaurant seating there is a pool table and camaraderie, bar appetizers. On your way out — Fill a 32 ounce can with a favorite beer on tap and watch staff can it. Or fill a growler. The packaging agency has full strength beer. Purchase 4 pack cans or Quarts.

Susie’s Branding Iron has The Back Door Bar, 2971 S. Hwy 191, which opens daily at 4 PM. Come around for Karaoke at 8 PM every Saturday night. The restaurant prides itself on a good home cooked meal too.

The Watering Hole is located in Zax’s Restaurant, 96 South Main, next to the Wet Spot Laundry so you could  have ‘Sudz while you clean your dudz’. There are also two pool tables, flat screens for the sports junkies, and claims the widest selection of brews in Moab.

Be entertained:

Just behind Zax’s there is an outdoor space, the Moab Backyard Theater. Variety shows play Wednesday through Saturday starting at 7 PM. A mix of music, magic, comedy and other talents entertain an audience seated on straw bales. Group reservations could enable performances on the other nights too. Just $5 per person!

Check out the free publication Moab Happenings for the live music section.

Eat:

  • Arches Thai is new in Moab, located on 100 West. It opened late February.
  • 98 Center, a restaurant, is named for the location, so new, the menu is unknown.
  • Sabuku Sushi, 90 E Center Street, is serving wine, sake and cocktails which go perfect with sushi and the desserts! Catch Sabuku on Facebook or Twitter for sporadic specials.

Dine & un-WINE-d is positively innovative. Sign up for drinks on a boat on the Colorado River before dinner from Canyonlands by Night. Motor upstream of the restaurant for  a few miles, then enjoy western music as the boat drifts back, where the landing leads up to cowboy fare in this riverside venue, Canyonlands By Night, 1861 N Hwy 191. Canyonlands by Night provides complimentary hotel pickups for those with reservations for either Dine & un-WINE-d or the Sound & Light Show which occurs after dinner. After dinner the boat powers upstream in time for dark to fall. The audience listens to a pre-recorded monologue while flood lights illuminate canyon walls.

Get Around:

Sunset Gill, 900 N Hwy 191, currently provides complimentary downtown hotel and campground pickups for dining in the former home of Uranium Millionaire Charlie Steen. Get a bird’s eye view of the Moab Valley from this restaurant on the valley wall. The drink menu has an array of red and white wines, scotch, plus a long list of beers.

The Rio Sports Bar and Grill, 2 South 100 West, claims bigger shots and stronger drinks for the same great price. DJ music spins on weekends. Occasionally hosts karaoke. Look for the giant blue-green lizard adorning the front of this building. The Rio has deck seating outside. Arrange to use the complimentary shuttle – 435-259-2654.

Aarchway Inn, 1551 N. Hwy 191, has a complimentary shuttle for hotel guests to get to town for evenings. It is as simple as contacting the front desk to make arrangements for dinner in Moab.

Finally, the Moab Information Center, at the corner of Main and Center Streets, will close in the evening, however, the public restrooms are kept open until 10 PM at night for the convenience of visitors strolling downtown in Moab. Get out and enjoy!

Memorial Day Availability is below. Use http://www.discovermoab.com/lodging.htm to contact businesses that have not included contact information.

mem 1.JPG

mem2.JPG

Mem3

mem4

mem6.JPGmem5.JPG

The Moab Travel Council is proud to announce an addition to the museum collection in Moab. The soft opening occurred in September for the Paleosafari Moab Giants. The museum is based on dinosaurs and the many fossil track sites located in the Moab area for inspiration. The location is on the way to other Moab attractions: Dead Horse Point State Park and Canyonlands National Park’s Island in the Sky District. Moab Giants is sure to become an attraction in its own right. Check out the overall history of the region at the Museum of Moab only two blocks off of Main Street. The Film Museum is a terrific stop for the scenic byway drive on Highway 128 or during the whole of the La Sal Loop, a drive from desert to alpine and back.

When you enter the Film Museum at Red Cliffs Ranch, prepare to look back over years of black and white filmmaking. The Film Museum features several of the most cherished actors and actresses, along with highlights from recent film projects that have taken advantage of the spectacular scenery surrounding Moab. John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Rock Hudson, Henry Fonda, Anthony Quinn, Lee Marvin, and James Stewart have all worked on location at the Red Cliff’s Ranch, then known as the White’s Ranch. More recently Geronimo, Thelma & Louise, 127 Hours, The Lone Ranger, and Transformers: Age of Extinction along with other movies and over 100 commercials have all used the Moab area as a location. The museum houses memorabilia from the early films to the present and is ever changing. The museum is self-guided and open to the public daily at no charge.

Museum of Moab houses regional accounts from prehistoric vestiges to Ute occupation through Spanish Explorers and the mining boom. Exhibits representative of early residents and include minerals and paleontological specimens. The upper level often has an art exhibit and special collections circulate into public view throughout the year on the main floor. Admission is $5 for adults. Children under 17 are free with a paid adult or families are admitted for $10. Closed on Sundays, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years and Independence Day.

Take this quiz, to see how long you would last in a dinosaur park. And be glad that the dinosaur’s are NOT alive in Moab. Open as of September 1, 2015, Paleosafari Moab Giants, has been created to feature dinosaur tracks, the first museum in the world to focus on tracks along with an interactive museum, films and dino statues in the world! Included in admission is 3D cinema – a short reckoning of the world and first life. A track museum with interactive touch screens, a playground with a water feature, and the dinosaur trail – a half mile of full-size reconstructions of dinosaurs having made tracks in the area are featured. The trail is punctuated with digs in the sand for bone and track casts. Stop in the gift shop for cherished dinosaur items. Plan to eat at the café before leaving on your next adventure. Expect to see the 5D Paleoaquarium March 1, 2016, during the Grand Opening of Paleosafari Moab Giants.

Ages 18 – 64 are adults admitted for $25, students age 13- 17 are charged $22, children age 4- 12 cost $19 as do senior citizens. Kids under 3 are admitted free. Groups of 15 or more will receive a 20% discount. Grade school class trips will receive a special discount too. The park shall be open seven days a week from 10 am – 6 pm. Find museum details on http://discovermoab.com/museums.htm. And open the Moab Travel Council’s newest webpage http://discovermoab.com/moab_dinosaurs.htm for a plethora of track locations.

Look at all the Winter Activities 2015-2016 in Moab Utah!

Please note, tours are based on conditions. Businesses have alternative itineraries and reasonable cancellation policies in winter.

Use http://udottraffic.utah.gov/ to see real time road conditions across Utah. Just click a camera along your planned drive. Likely to find this information with each state’s Department of Transportation too.

Connect to Activities:

Hikes and Photography tours

  • Deep Desert Expeditions

Jeep and Hiking tours

  • Tag-A-Long Expeditions

Hummer tours, National Park Tours, Fiery Furnace hikes

  • Moab Adventure Center
  • Backcountry Jeep trips in Canyonlands and Arches National Parks
  • Adrift Adventures

Arches and Island in the Sky tours

  • PRI/Moab Geo Tours

Four Wheel Drive tours

  • Xtreme 4×4

Hummer and ATV Tours and Rentals

  • Highpoint Hummer

ATV Tours and Rentals

  • Moab Tour Company
  • Moab Cowboy Off-Road Adventures

Rock Climbing and Canyoneering

  • Red River Adventures
  • Moab Desert Adventures

Winery

  • Spanish Valley Vineyards

By appointment

801 520 5029 Curt cell

801 419 9470 Alesia cell

Museums

  • Moab Film Museum
  • Moab Giants
  • Museum of Moab

Mountain Bike Tours

  • Magpie Cycling
  • Moab Mountain Bike Instruction
  • Rim Tours
  • Dreamrides

Horseback Riding

  • Backcountry Trail Rides
  • Global Endurance Center

Scenic flights

  • Redtail Aviation

Extras:

  • Rim Cyclery has x-country touring skis for rent.
  • GearHeads has snowshoes for rent.
  • Pagan Mountaineering has ice axes, crampons, snow shoes, and poles for rent.
  • Moab Information Center hours are 9 AM – 5 PM Thursday – Monday with Tuesdays’ 1- 5 PM and Wednesdays’ 9 AM – 2 PM.

last month, the lodging of Moab was contacted to share availability for November 6, 7, 8 2015. Some of these may still be available. 

Rooms:

Sorrel River Ranch Resort & Spa

T: 435.259.4642

TF: 877.317.8244

F: 435.259.3016

E: Stay@SorrelRiver.com

HC 64 Box 4002 Highway 128 Mile 17

Moab, UT 84532

www.SorrelRiver.com

Both of the Center Street Suites are still available for that weekend. www.homeaway.com/479168  and www.homeaway.com/479166

Kel Darnell

Center Street Condos

303-619-1954

We still have plenty of rooms.  Please call or book at www.silversageinn.com.

Silver Sage Inn
840 S. Main Street
Moab, UT 84532

Tel: (435) 259-4420
Fax: (435) 259-2347
E-mail: office@silversageinn.com
www.silversageinn.com

We are booked Nov 6, 7. We have 5 rooms available Nov 8.

Cali Cochitta B&B

259-4961

2 room left on Saturday if that helps at the Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott Moab

1863 N Hwy 191

Moab, Utah  84532

Office:  435.259.5350

Cell:  435.260.1776

Red Cliffs has 11 queen cabins and 5 king cabins.  Rate is $239.95 plus 10.2% tax double occupancy. judy@redcliffslodge.com

We do have  about 25 rooms still available for Nov. 6-8.

Redstone Inn

Moab ,Utah

1-800-772-1972 Or 1-435-259-3500

We have 19 starting at 96.00/nt plus tax.

Hotel Moab Downtown

TEL: (435) 259-7141

FAX: (435) 259-6299

info@hotemoabdowntown.com

www.hotelmoabdowntown.com

We have several rooms available ranging from $150-220 per night plus tax.  Price includes a big homemade breakfast spread.

Innkeeper

Sunflower Hill Inn

Tel. 435-259-2974

Reservations: 800-662-2786

Email: innkeeper@sunflowerhill.com

www.sunflowerhill.com

Quality Suites rooms available for November 6, 7 & 8, 2015 with either one king bed or two queen beds we are all non smoking.
Rate would be $149.00 plus tax —   AAA or AARP rate  $134.10 plus tax.
Quality Suites
800 S Main

The LaunchPad has openings for Novemeber 6,7,8 : 590 North 500 West,Moab, UT  84532, (208) 290-1717

 

Condos:

Puesta del Sol Accommodations, LLC

VRBO #590324, see:  http://www.vrbo.com/590324

VRBO #672209, see:  http://www.vrbo.com/672209

Contact:

Colleen Kennedy

ckennedy@colleenkennedy.com

(435) 260-9473

Accommodations Unlimited has several 2 and 3 bedroom condos available for Nov 6-9.
435-259-6575
https://moabcondorentals.com/

Alex Purvis reports ample availability at Whispering Oaks Ranch

435-259-7666

www.whisperingoakslodging.com

3 bedroom condominium available. With Julianne Tronier.

Taftron, LLC

801.556.9147

www.vrbo.com/183912

Arrival  11/6/15 – Departure 11/8/15      For a party size of 2 adults

Purple Sage  4 ,5 ,2

$133.00/night (plus $39.99 reservation fee, & tax) For a grand total of $347.61

Moab Springs Ranch 19

$226.10/night (plus $39.99 reservation fee, & tax) For a grand total of $559.13

Lizards Lair ~ 3246

$171.00/night (plus $39.99 reservation fee, & tax) For a grand total of $422.32

You can also view a complete listing of our availability at www.moabutahlodging.com.  When you are ready to book you can do so through our secure website, using the following link or by calling us at 800.505.5343.

3 bdrm townhome
Rim Village Vistas 4a3
www.vrbo.com/175802

max 6 guests

No smoking, No pets Dream Home Real Estate Cell # 970-445-8227

Camping:

ACT Campground

435-355-0355

1536 S. Mill Creek Dr.

Moab, UT 84532

ACTCampground.com

Portal RV Resort
435-259-6108
info@portalrvresort.com
We still have a lot of open sites (partial and full hook-ups available)

Pack Creek Campground has availability.

As of right now we are just starting to take reservations for November.  They cannot reserve them online and would have to call us or email us for a site reservation. Thank you. Slickrock Campground  435-259-7660  or reservations.slickrock@gmail.com

OKRV Park and Canyonlands Stables $35 a night

3310 Spanish Valley Dr.

Moab, UT 84532

435.259-1400

office@okarpark.com

www.okrvpark.com

fax 435.259-0144

November 6, 7, 8 Availability – We have lots of cabins in several price ranges available still. We have almost all of our RV sites and all of our tent sites available still. Thanks.

Reed Pendleton

Moab Rim Campark

1900 South Highway 191

Moab, Utah 84532

435-259-5002

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.